Feature Articles

Every year, in early to mid-November, residents of and visitors to eastern Taiwan can immerse themselves in the sounds of the mountains and oceans at two large-scale music festivals in Hualien and Taitung.
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The Mayuan Community lies within the East Rift Valley in Wanrong Township of Hualien County. Most of the residents here are indigenous Bunun. However, as there are also Truku and Amis communities nearby, mutual influences have created a unique culture. The The Mayuan Community is not a well-known tourist destination, which has allowed it to preserve its natural and farming landscapes, as well as cultural traditions.
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Traditional indigenous community lifestyles are gradually disappearing and economic opportunities in indigenous communities are limited, forcing many residents to move elsewhere in search of employment. This has made it difficult for traditions, history, art forms and language to be passed on, creating further cultural crises. The Hualien Association of Indigenous Industries was established to attempt to reverse some of these trends.
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Dulan, or Atolan in the Amis language, is a coastal settlement north of Taitung City. In recent years, there has been a large influx of outsiders coming here to surf, open art studios, restaurants and hostels, leading to the marginalization of the Amis in their own community. Some of the Amis have responded by working hard to preserve and revive their traditions and culture. For example, the Ina Craft Studio, hidden along a small road, opposite the San Marino Bakery, specializes in betel sheath crafts and mini yarn pompom crafts, both of which are important in the Amis material culture.
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This is the last part of an eight-part article introducing the traditional names, meanings and legends associated with 34 glass beads of the Paiwan tribe.
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This is the seventh part of an eight-part article introducing the traditional names, meanings and legends associated with 34 glass beads of the Paiwan tribe.
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This is the sixth part of an eight-part article introducing the traditional names, meanings and legends associated with 34 glass beads of the Paiwan tribe.
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This is the fifth part of an eight-part article introducing the traditional names, meanings and legends associated with 34 glass beads of the Paiwan tribe.
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This is the fourth part of an eight-part article introducing the traditional names, meanings and legends associated with 34 glass beads of the Paiwan tribe.
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This is the third part of an eight-part article introducing the traditional names, meanings and legends associated with 34 glass beads of the Paiwan tribe.
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This is the second part of an eight-part article introducing the traditional names, meanings and legends associated with 34 glass beads of the Paiwan tribe.
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The Paiwan tribe traditionally possessed a strict social hierarchy that consisted of chieftain and clan, nobility and commoners. Colorful glass beads have long been an important part of that tradition. These beads were a symbol of one's status with certain beads reserved for the chieftain and nobility. Such beads were considered the most beautiful and valuable.
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The Exchange Exhibition of Wood Sculpture, Taiwan vs. Spain, was held at the Wood Sculpture Museum of Sanyi Township in Miaoli County of Taiwan from July 20 to September 28, 2009. Following this, the exhibition traveled to the Royal Shipyards (Reales Atarazanas) of Valencia, where they were on display until the summer of 2010.Kamuli Pelen is a member of the Paiwan tribe from Pingtung County in southern Taiwan.
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